Contact: (08) 8645 7677 Student Services: (08) 8645 5729
Contact: (08) 8645 7677 Student Services: (08) 8645 5729

House Culture

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HomeOur StudentsHouse Culture

HOUSE CULTURE

EJEHS has established 4 houses which staff and students are allocated to; Baxter, Wylie, Flinders and Sturt.  By having these houses, it provides a foundation for relationships to be established between staff and students.

Students can gain points for their house through positive attendance, academic achievement, involvement in school community events, engagement in school sport, inter-house competitions and the Principal’s Award.

EJEHS has established 4 houses which staff and students are allocated to; Baxter, Wylie, Flinders and Sturt.  By having these houses, it provides a foundation for relationships to be established between staff and students.

Students can gain points for their house through positive attendance, academic achievement, involvement in school community events, engagement in school sport, inter-house competitions and the Principal’s Award.

The house system is used to promote a positive school culture, encourage school connectedness and celebrate student success. A strategy used to promote and celebrate these achievements and successes are whole-school assemblies, which occur twice a term.

In 2019, we  introduced a staff House Team to monitor the progress of all students. The purpose of the House Team is to acknowledge and celebrate the success of students in the areas of attendance, achievement and participation.

In addition, the House Team will proactively intervene to ensure that students are supported in meeting their individual education and learning needs.

Our 4 houses were named after prominent historical figures in our local region and surrounding areas.

More information is available via these links;

█ BAXTER ▾

LEADER

Tash Rayson

ABOUT JOHN BAXTER

John Baxter was born in Ireland in 1799 and was convicted of receiving stolen goods in 1826.

Upon release in 1833, Baxter began working for explorer Edward John Eyre. Eyre described Baxter as “a good cooper and rough carpenter, and … a most useful, well-behaved man”.

Whilst Baxter was not highly educated nor sophisticated, he was a valuable friend to Eyre assisting in the exploration of the Eyre Peninsula and Southern Coast of Australia.

On April 29 1841, John Baxter was murdered whilst sleeping in his swag. John Baxter’s name is still remembered through Baxter Range, Baxter Cliffs and John Baxter’s memorial.

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█ FLINDERS ▾

LEADER

Kristy Patterson

ABOUT CAPTAIN MATTHEW FLINDERS

Born in England in 1774, Matthew Flinders was the first navigator to circumnavigate Australia. Flinders’ name is now associated with over 100 geographical features and places in Australia. 

Well known landmarks named after Matthew Flinders include hospitals, universities, suburbs, streets, and mountain ranges.

After years on the ocean and exploring the Australian coastline, Flinders was forced to return to England to repair his vessel the Investigator.

Despite his contribution to science, Flinders was imprisoned by French officials as a result of a war that had begun between France and England. On July 19 1814, Matthew Flinders passed away. This was 1 day after books about his discoveries and journeys were published.
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█ WYLIE ▾

LEADER

Sean Sheedy

ABOUT WYLIE

Wylie was born in the King George Sound area on the southern coast of Western Australia in approximately 1824. 

When he was approximately 16 years of age Wylie met Edward John Eyre who asked Wylie to join his exploration team.

Wylie joined Eyre, John Baxter and 2 other Indigenous men on their journey across the Nullarbor.

Wylie was with John Baxter when he was murdered by other members of exploration party. Wylie and Edward John Eyre were left on their own with minimal supplies or equipment. When Eyre and Wylie continued they came across communities who had mourned his absence.

Wylie was later awarded a medal and money for being faithful and loyal to Eyre.

There are no records kept of Wylie after 1853.

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█ STURT ▾

LEADER

Esther Maleki

ABOUT CAPTAIN CHARLES STURT

Charles Sturt was born in 1795 and has become one of the most important people associated with early South Australia. 

In 1827, Sturt escorted a shipment of convicts to NSW after spending time in the British Army.

Sturt was responsible for the discovery of the Murray River whilst exploring the unmapped areas of Australia. Through his exploration and time spent where the Murray meets the ocean, Sturt was hugely influential in the decision to colonise South Australia.

A failed farmer, Sturt accompanied the like of John McDouall Stuart in exploring, surveying and mapping large areas of Northern South Australia.
Sturt suddenly died in 1869 after variable health. Captain Charles Sturt is remembered through the Sturt Stony Desert, Sturt River, Sturt Desert Pea and also has Universities in NSW.
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